A BALANCED MEAL

Balanced Meals and Nutrition

A balanced meal is a meal that has a food from each one of the five food groups: (1) Cereals, (2) proteins, (3) dairy, (4) fruits, and (5) vegetables. Cereals are also referred as grains or carbohydrates. Balanced meals are important for children because they provide the nutrients necessary for healthy body growth, strong bones, and brain development. They also create the conditions for an overall good health. Nutrition is another concept related to balanced meals. The World Health Organization  (https://goo.gl/FmV6o6) says “Good nutrition – an adequate, well balanced diet combined with regular physical activity – is a cornerstone of good health. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, impaired physical and mental development, and reduced productivity” The following chart, Standard Diet for Children, describes in a very general way the type of diet suitable for children depending on their age. The indicated ages are not exact. Times vary for each child. Consult your medical professional for the best advice.

Nutrition for Children Younger Than Six Months

Children younger than 6 months old should have a milk based diet. Milk should be obtained from breastfeeding or from formula. After that time, cow’s milk is acceptable.

Nutrition for Children Six to Twelve Months Old

Children older than six months and younger than twelve months are ready for the gradual substitution of breastfeeding by other foods. This is a time of transitional diet. The foods provided during this period should include the five food groups. These foods are mostly soft and easy to digest. When tolerated by a child, whole milk should be provided. Soy milk or goat milk may be indicated by medical professionals as proper substitutes for cow milk. Avoid during these months “creative” milks such as condensed milk, evaporated milk, undissolved powdered milk, rice milk, almond milk, and coconut milk.

Nutrition for Children Twelve to Twenty-Four Months Old

Children during their first year start to gain independence. Their nutrition is a reflection of their development. During this time, the nutrition should be provided by a transitional self-feeding diet. Solid foods should be gradually introduced during this stage.

Children Two Years-Old and

Older

Children two-years old and older are ready for balanced meals as indicated on the Children Diet Type Summary Chart included above. NutriCards Kosher is an excellent aid to achieve this goal. There is not a set rule for children portion size. However, an adequate portion size should consider age, size, and physical activity of each child. A good guideline for an appropriate portion size for fruits and vegetables is the size of the hand palm of your child. For additional information, review the USDA’s Choose My Plate program (www.choosemyplate.gov) Remarks Exposed your child to nutritious foods on a regular basis. Eating habits and food preferences start to be developed at a very early age. Provide your child with good quality foods. Whenever it is possible, favor organic foods. Minimally processed foods usually support a better child development: Higher nutritional content, a more interesting sensory experience, and a more effective digestion. Add to that the emotional component, that when positive, it will be carried as a pleasant emotion the rest of your child’s life. Very often, minimally processed foods are cheaper. For children learning how to eat solid foods, pay attention to the food geometry to prevent choking. Avoid cylindrical foods such as thick slices of sausages, carrot pieces, and broccoli steams sections that can block the pharynx, a common part of the digestive and respiratory systems. The pharynx can be also be blocked by spherical foods such as grapes, large blueberries, or small tomatoes. Avoid also small spherical foods that can end in their nose. For more information, read Infant choking: How to keep your baby safe from Mayo Clinic (https://goo.gl/lJESN2)
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LETíS CONNECT Standard Diet for Children

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A BALANCED

MEAL

Balanced Meals and

Nutrition

A balanced meal is a meal that has a food from each one of the five food groups: (1) Cereals, (2) proteins, (3) dairy, (4) fruits, and (5) vegetables. Cereals are also referred as grains or carbohydrates. Balanced meals are important for children because they provide the nutrients necessary for healthy body growth, strong bones, and brain development. They also create the conditions for an overall good health. Nutrition is another concept related to balanced meals. The World Health Organization  (https://goo.gl/FmV6o6) says “Good nutrition – an adequate, well balanced diet combined with regular physical activity – is a cornerstone of good health. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, impaired physical and mental development, and reduced productivity” The following chart, Standard Diet for Children,  describes in a very general way the type of diet suitable for children depending on their age. The indicated ages are not exact. Times vary for each child. Consult your medical professional for the best advice.

Nutrition for

Children Younger

Than Six Months

Children younger than 6 months old  - babies - should have a milk based diet. Milk should be obtained from breastfeeding or from formula. After that time, cow’s milk is acceptable.

Nutrition for

Children Six to

Twelve Months Old 

Children older than six months and younger than twelve months are ready for the gradual substitution of breastfeeding by other foods. This is a time of transitional diet. The foods provided during this period should include the five food groups. These foods are mostly soft and easy to digest. When tolerated by a child, whole milk should be provided. Soy milk or goat milk may be indicated by medical professionals as proper substitutes for cow milk. Avoid during these months “creative” milks such as condensed milk, evaporated milk, undissolved powdered milk, rice milk, almond milk, and coconut milk.

Nutrition for

Children Twelve to

Twenty-Four Months

Old

Children during their first year start to gain independence. Their nutrition is a reflection of their development. During this time, the nutrition should be provided by a transitional self-feeding diet. Solid foods should be gradually introduced during this stage. 

Children Two Years-

Old and Older

Children two-years old and older are ready for balanced meals as indicated on the Children Diet Type Summary Chart included above. NutriCards Kosher is an excellent aid to achieve this goal. There is not a set rule for children portion size. However, an adequate portion size should consider age, size, and physical activity of each child. A good guideline for an appropriate portion size for fruits and vegetables is the size of the hand palm of your child. For additional information, review the USDA’s Choose My Plate program (www.choosemyplate.gov) Remarks Exposed your child to nutritious foods on a regular basis. Eating habits and food preferences start to be developed at a very early age. Provide your child with good quality foods. Whenever it is possible, favor organic foods. Minimally processed foods usually support a better child development: Higher nutritional content, a more interesting sensory experience, and a more effective digestion. Add to that the emotional component, that when positive, it will be carried as a pleasant emotion the rest of your child’s life. Very often, minimally processed foods are cheaper. For children learning how to eat solid foods, pay attention to the food geometry to prevent choking. Avoid cylindrical foods such as thick slices of sausages, carrot pieces, and broccoli steams sections that can block the pharynx, a common part of the digestive and respiratory systems. The pharynx can be also be blocked by spherical foods such as grapes, large blueberries, or small tomatoes. Avoid also small spherical foods that can end in their nose. For more information, read Infant choking: How to keep your baby safe from Mayo Clinic (https://goo.gl/lJESN2)
Receive updates and information about good nutrition for children

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© Nutripromise, LLC 2017. All Rights Reserved
LETíS CONNECT Standard Diet for Children Indicated ages are not exact. Consult your medical professional for the best advice Transitional self-feeding diet Solid foods Milk based diet Transitional diet  + cowís milk Soft foods 1 2 2 2 3 4 5 6 m. 12 m. 24 m. Self-feeding diet Balanced meals 0 m.

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3+2balanced meals + snacks / day Lunch Dinner Breakfast Morning Snack Afternoon Snack
NUTRITION FOR CHILDREN